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Fall is here and towns all over Italy are celebrating local products and seasonal fare.  Visitors to Italy can find food festivals throughout the country, celebrating autumn’s bounties such as truffles, mushrooms, chestnuts, and chocolate.

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If you eat truffles in high-end American restaurants, you’ll easily pay hundreds of dollars for a few shavings.

In Italy, especially during the truffle hunting season and the Alba International White Truffle fair, it seems like there’s so many in circulation, it’s hard to understand why prices are so high!

Truffles Cannot be Grown, Only Found


Finding a fist-sized white truffle—white truffles are rarer than black summer truffles—is no easy feat. They’re so hard to come by that truffle hunters go out at night to keep anyone form following them to their best truffle foraging grove.

Dogs—not pigs, who might eat the truffles they find—paw at the ground when they find the scent—and truffle hunters unearth their prize with a special, spade-like digging tool.

And while truffle hunts for tourists can make the whole thing look simple, digging up handfuls of black truffles in just a couple hours, it can take trained truffle hunters and their dogs weeks to come upon the massive truffles you see at the market, often pulling 12-or-more-hour days all the while.

The International Truffle Fair


In the end, the hunt is worth it though. At the international fair, white truffles can fetch 3,000 euros a kilo!

When I saw hunters selling their wares out of the trunk of their car on the side of the road, though, the truffles were going for 250 euro a kilo.

For consumer, it is a huge savings to get them from the source, before they go through layers of middlemen at the markets and restaurants to finally reach your plate.

Cooking with Real Truffles at Home


For cooking yourself, it’s best to get the grated truffles stored in oil, but if you get your hands on the real thing, there are two perfect ways to enjoy it.

In our newsletter, we showcased a recipe for Tajarin with Truffles, the traditional handmade Piemontese pasta that is the best loved accompaniment for these treasured tubers.

But my favorite way to enjoy them—which also happens to be the most simple—is grated over fried eggs.
in Cultural 1838 0
When you think of different types of dining establishments, most fall into one of two categories-sit down or take out, fine dining or casual, restaurants in cafes.

But in Italy, they seem to have a dizzying number of names for places that, ostensibly, all seem like sit down restaurants: trattoria, ristorante, osteria, enoteca, and the list goes on.

When you're out in Italy, how do you know what you're getting? There are basically five grades of sit-down restaurant, two types of wine bars, and two main types of take-out place.

Sit-Down Restaurants:



  • Ristorante - This is the top grade of Italian dining establishments, with conscientious service, fine dining plating and dishes, and often a well-known chef.

  • Trattoria - Trattorias are wonderful casual places to eat, whether for a pre-set lunch menu or a dinner out. They focus on typical Italian fare, without the fusion flare you may see in ristorantes.

  • Osteria - Osterias are much like trattorias, but a bit more casual with a focus on regional specialties.

  • Tavola Calda - In a tavola calda, there is typically no table service. You choose your food from a cafeteria style serving set up. These are primarily in Florence.

  • Pizzeria - In Italy, pizzarias are sit-down restaurants that predominantly serve pizza with wine, a variety of salads, and a few pasta selections.


Wine bars:



  • Enoteca - For a more formal wine tasting experience in line with American wine bars, head to an enoteca. Today, many are high-design and high-tech, though the food options are typically limited.

  • Taverna - Tavernas are more old-fashioned, like an Italian version of a British pub, with wine instead of beer. Food is very traditional, simple fare.


Take-out:



  • Pizza a taglio - For a slice of pizza on the run, look for a pizza a taglio (literally: by the slice). There may be limited seating, but squares of pizza, calzones, and occasionally some desserts are packaged up to take away.

  • Rosticceria - Unlike pizza a taglio places, which expect people to be eating their food on the go, rosticcerias typically serve hot food, primarily meat and roast vegetable dishes, to take and eat at home. If you're looking for an entire chicken, this is the place.

in Italy 10703 0

photo-3 copy 4This month, I headed to the Veneto, the region surrounding Venice, for the Buy Venice show, an excellent place to find stunning, artisanally-made Italian products.

While I have certainly found many new items for my “Things I Love” column in the newsletter, especially these Le Furlane hand-made slippers sold under the Rialto, I have to tell you about something even better than a new pair of earrings or gourmet food to tuck in your luggage:

The Real City of Love




Instead of Venice, get away from all the crowds in Verona. It’s only 1:15 away from Venice by train.

Though romantics flock to Venice for its canals, labyrinthine streets, and myths of Casanova, affluent Verona was the backdrop for one of the world’s greatest love stories, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

Try to visit when there is a performance in the Roman Amphitheatre, which was built in 30 AD and remains one of the best preserved Roman structures in the world. All summer, modern renditions of classic operas take place in candlelight in the amphitheater.

What Can You Do in Verona?


During my visit, we rented bicycles through the newly installed bike share program, which allows you to see the whole city, including crossing the Roman bridge on the Adige River many times, for only two euros for two hours.

It’s a great way to get to the cloister and 11th-century church of San Zeno, typically only reachable by car.

The city is predominately flat, so cycling is the perfect way to see it. (Be warned: they’ll put a EU 300 hold on your credit card.)

Beyond Venice, there are many enticing day trips from Verona:

  • the Valpolicella wineries, where wine has been produced since Ancient Greeks settled the area

  • Lake Garda, Italy’s largest lake

  • Bolzano, capital of the German-Italian culture mélange that is the Alto Adige

  • the 10th-century Soave Castle

  • the UNESCO World Heritage Palladian Villas


To be honest, “Juliet’s balcony,” which is not necessarily the real balcony of the real Juliet (if there was one), was far from the highlight of the trip. If you go, avoid it or go late at night, after the graffiti-writing teens have all gone home, to give the breast of the bronze statue of Giulette the customary good luck rub.

Indulge Yourself in Verona


photo-3 copy 3We spoiled ourselves at Al Desco, one of Italy’s famous top dinning experiences.

If you go, be prepared to pay for that spot on service and millefoglie baccala mantecato. The decor is stylish, as was the clientele. Not an American was in the room.photo-3 copy

There are many hotels worth mentioning, and we will do so in a future newsletter, but for now we focus on The Gentlemen of Verona Relais.

photo-3 copy 2This discreet but seductively luxurious boutique hotel on an side street not far from the Arena opened two months ago. The spacious and stylish rooms have all the modern comforts. Contact us for booking details.

Plan a few days in Verona. You’ll be glad you did.
in Italy 1676 0



Fall in Italy is when food gets serious.

Both in terms of work load—it’s wine harvest time!—and in terms of flavors.

The richest produce that comes out of Italy, from olive oil to truffles to figs to the deep purple grapes that flavor schiacciata, makes its appearance in the fall.

So it’s little surprise that some of the most important food festivals on the Italian calendar fall at the same time.

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in Italy 1561 0

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